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Supporting a Service Member

 

. . . accelerating the communication mastery process so as to consistently produce the results you say you want, for yourself and those with whom you relate.

 

Following presumes that you presently have a friend or loved one serving in the military.

 

We begin with the premise that one cannot not support. Each of us, using our unique set of leadership (verbal, non-verbal, physical, and psychic) communication-skills, either forward others or we unconsciously intend for them, and therefore ourselves, to stay stuck in mediocrity; some of us are programmed to thwart others.

 

The way to tell which set of leadership-support skills you have mastered is to look at the results those around you are producing. Is everyone around you enjoying their activities, keeping their agreements, handling their car/health insurance and debts responsibly, continually acknowledging their perpetrations, with lots of laughing and giggling throughout each day? If yes, then it can be said that you've mastered supporting others positively.

 

Think of this subject as a Boot Camp for Civilians. In other words, it's appropriate that as a civilian you undergo an equally transformational educational experience as did your friend during his/her boot camp; your boot camp is about expanding your ability to positively support others and in so doing improve your ability to manifest your stated intentions.

 

When playing the communication mastery game the way to maintain and expand upon your positive support skills is to interact with as many others as possible (inspiring and enrolling others in having life work). i.e. Sharing this website with a friend.

 

We're going to say that the oft repeated phrase, we are all connected, is even more true than we've suspected.  We all know that our personal integrity affects our own outcomes. In other words, we know that the integrity of our house, car, finances, taxes, and relationships, all affect our outcomes; however, what's also true is that our integrity affects everyone with whom we relate, including the ones who are now serving us (you) in the military.

 

It may be that you are going though a phase (education-development-wise) in which your curriculum requires that you deny responsibility for what's "happening" with a friend or loved one, or throughout the world.

 

For example:


"I'm not responsible for your prosperity or health. How I communicate, my leadership-communication skills, have absolutely nothing to do with your successes or whether or not you opt for healthy choices. My integrity does not affect mission outcomes. I'm not willing to be that powerful."

 

As with an alcoholic this position (denial) is an essential component of the communication mastery curriculum. Not to worry. If there are any truths herein the subject of responsibility will pop up for you again; often it comes in the form of someone around you resisting being responsible for an outcome, someone blaming you or dumping reasons and excuses in your space.

 

This subject matter usually triggers lots of thoughts.  It entertains the uncomfortable notion that somehow there is (as Einstein called it) a faster-than-light, "spooky" connection between us. Through this mysterious entanglement phenomenon the karma of each of our actions is synched with everyone including service members serving, say in Afghanistan. A civilian's mind usually stops short of the realization that an out-integrity at home (say a verbal/non-verbal abusive communication with a family member, not acknowledged and cleaned up through-to-mutual-satisfaction) could affect the success of a military mission. U.S. Navy SEALs and their families acknowledge and operate from this premise.

 

It has yet to become part of any conventional military mission-briefing protocol to ask a soldier before going on a mission if he/she has any unacknowledged perpetrations, an incomplete, that might affect the success of the mission; yet when asked, there always is an incomplete in the space that could (and often does) serve as a barrier to manifesting a stated intention. There are no exceptions to this phenomenon.

 

Interestingly, when a leader who themselves are out-integrity asks this mission-briefing question they often don't elicit the truth; they simply aren't the space for truths to be told.  i.e. The constant cheating scandals in all the military academies. An Academy Commandant, who is out-integrity, simply can't inspire cadets to honor the Code of Conduct. Subordinates have absolutely no choice other than to mirror the integrity of their leader.

 

Some examples:

 

1) A present-day Navy SEAL team leader, during a mission briefing, will ask his team members, from a list of clearing questions, "Does anyone have an unacknowledged perpetration that might affect the outcome of our mission?" Years ago UDT-SEAL team buddies were not willing to be responsible for the personal integrity of fellow team members. i.e. "If my wife asks tell her I was with you." "How many cases of tax-free booze do you want to ship back to Little Creek?" BUD/S Training did not address the correlation between personal integrity and outcomes. If this paragraph triggers upset it reveals that you have an unacknowledged perpetration that you are withholding from someone. Silence is tantamount to sabotage, of yourself, your team members and its missions.


2) A Navy SEAL's spouse communicates, verbally or non-verbally, "If you cheat on me I will immediately divorce you; there will be no second chance, absolutely no excuses or reasons. Cheating (deception) will be the way you communicate that we (myself and the Naval Special Warfare community) don't deserve your respect." No teammate of honor can remain silent knowing that his personal integrity affects the outcomes of all missions and operations. Read about the wedding agreement that precludes cheating and other unacceptable behaviors.

 

This is where you at home can serve your country. You can formulate an intention to tap into the value of playing the integrity game.

 

If you'd like to expand your ability to positively support a service member press the Clearing Process for Professionals button—one clearing per day for five days in a row; then share your thoughts or ask a question on the free Message Board.

 

Last edited 2/5/17

 

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